Archive for the ‘Mobile’ Category

August 22, 2011

Is recent EMV announcement the catalyst the U.S. needs to catch up?

During this past year, the team at Portals and Rails has published several articles exploring the growing risks in card-based payments and the need to move to a more sophisticated and secure enabling technology. But overhauling a payment system is no easy task, as there are many players that need to collaborate, from the card networks to the bank issuers and merchants. How does the industry organize itself to orchestrate a much-needed transition?

http://portalsandrails.frbatlanta.org/2011/08/lessons-from-mario-brothers-finding-keys-to-fighting-fraud.html

Interesting question for the industry as we go through this transformation to a fully connected world where everything happens between our mobile phone and the merchant, friend, family, phone or cash.

 

 

This goes back to november 2010 when the announced ISIS.

 

Over the last week many of us have read and attempted to understand what are the goals and objectives of Isis and its owners AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile.

Visa reacted, pundits speak of ISIS becoming a new payment brand/system and Google, Ericson, Apple and RIM all are embracing NFC and speaking to inclusion in the mobile phone.

To include all these links would take more space than appropriate.  A simple Google search with key words like ISIS Mobile Commerce etc. will quickly get you to more than you could digest.

In the Isis press release they speak of creating the Mobile Wallet and talk about offering their services to merchants, Banks and carriers.  Yet in what capacity?  Clearly the relationship between the citizen and merchant today belong to the merchant, carriers and banks.  So one wonders if ISIS will interact directly or if the Banks, merchants and Carriers will be the channel to market for the underlining services ISIS offers. 
 
 Of significance is Bill Gajda’s, Visa’s head of mobile products, statements which does not identify Isis as a threat or a competitor.  He speaks to collaboration.  It will be interesting to see what MasterCard will say. 
 
As I thought about what ISIS wants to be, I was drawn to reread a paper produced by GSMA and ECP Global Switch Mobile Association and European Council for Payments.  That paper is titled.
 
 Trusted Service Manager Service Management Requirements and Specifications

Doc: EPC 220-08, Version 1.0 January 2010

What occurred to me is that  Isis could set itself up as a “Trusted Service Manager” TSM, taking on a trust function supporting Issuers and Mobile Network Operators MNO and why not the merchant; who all all talk about the capabilities of the mobile phone and will want to dematerialize their cards and install their certificates, data and applets within the context of a mobile wallet.   ISIS  can then derive their revenue from fees assocaited with “Trust” and assuring the identity of the owner of the phone,.

I do not see ISIS becoming a new means of payment.  I see them becoming an enabler that helps build the business case to drive the necessary investments merchants and carriers must make to assure the consumer that they can move all their cards into their mobile phone.  Mobile Commerce is the key words that leads me to think about coupons, loyalty, rewards, push marketing …

As we all know contactless and NFC are not getting the traction one might have expected.  Mobile loyalty, Mobile commerce, services branded as a means of enhancing the customer experience those I do imagine will excite merchants and consuemrs to demand NFC capabiliites.  Imagine walking into a store and getting coupons and discounts as you tap and add to your shopping cart.  Clearly merchants appreciate that they can drive consumers to buy more it they can excite them.

So what is ISIS truly going to do, compete, collaborate or enable?
 
 

The path for the USA to EMV

http://www.finextra.com/community/fullblog.aspx?blogid=5875

EMV: Let the planning begin

 

There’s no way around it – EMV transition planning will be complicated. However, while EMV is a complex specification, the good news is that it can grow over time. Thus the key is to implement an infrastructure that lets you start with a simple, single portfolio that can expand and mature with you. Looking forward, the goal is to do it once, do it properly and avoid the pain of re-doing it when it’s time to move into mobile payments

I agree totally with this sentiment. Mobile is here. EMV addresses the requirement to include Dynamic data in a payment transaction to address questions of identity and irritability.

Update 02/22/2012

Having had a chance to sit inside EMVCo working group meeting and being fully aware of those words read every time that reminded us of our confidentiality and sharing of patent and secrets that might jeopardize the future of EMV.

What I saw was the successful release of the EMV contactless specifications and type approval processes capable of testing tap if one remembers the distance has to be 2 cm instead of 10.  Otherwise the protocol and security will last us until 2025.  Plans where underway as I left that where focusing on expanding the standardization of mobile and the development of a next generation or EMV 2.0.  They are talking about 2015 and 2017 for probably dates that these new specifications and processes would be in place to allow widespread adoption so that circa 2030.  If hey are right we have a new and transparent solution that opens and never hinders access to whatever we have the right to access.  what about the next 17 years,

Well, EMV works.  It already includes mobile and contactless.

Visa and MasterCard have said yes.  Amex is OK, discover has had lots of ads for payment people with EMV knowledge and such titles.

The Federal Reserve seems to be on-board and Global Platform, NFC and Mobey forum seem to be OK.

Looks like a plan to me.

NSTIC and EMV should merge

October 03, 2011

Cyberspace trust: Proving you’re not a dog

A very real discomfort underlies the classic joke: “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” How can you prove your own identity and confirm the identity of others during virtual interactions? Every time you reach out to a friend on Gchat, post on a classmate’s Facebook wall, or send money to a colleague via PayPal, you are relying on a key assumption: that the person you’re reaching out to behind that Gmail address, Facebook profile, or PayPal screen name is who they say they are. Without this baseline confidence, online interactions and commerce would be paralyzed.

http://portalsandrails.frbatlanta.org/2011/10/cyberspace-trust-proving-youre-not-dog.html

Philip thinks:

  • The next step is to merge the identity sought by everyone and easily relegated to the Banks to manage.  Facebook and GMail offer an option if their KYC can be improved.  With face to face meeting it is possible to truly prove identity, requiring a branch network.
  • Transaction processing is legacy in the developed world while the emerging economies offer an opportunity to build new.  Existing standards and processes need to be respected as they transform to absorb the new information attachments and Internet offers we now need to cope with.
  • The Wallet forms the basic unit to create a trusted network employing smart cards, trusted computing, persistent computing and inteligence to enable the consumer experience.
  • Privacy and integrity of that trust is essential to the system
  • The individual is key
  • Respect rights and obligations